IT’S DIFFICULT TO LEARN FROM A BOOK WHEN YOU CAN’T READ WHAT’S ON THE PAGE.

A child’s brain develops faster from birth to age 3 than at any other point in their life – about two-and-a-half times more active than an adult’s. Practicing the alphabet, learning numbers, identifying colors and practicing writing names and words are all key factors in building the foundation for reading and school readiness.

In the age of modern literacy and its emphasis upon having students take on more challenging text, independent reading and student choice can easily take a back seat to the demands of increased rigor. However, in a balanced literacy program, they remain important.

Motivation and choice play key roles in reading.

And, strong and capable readers are those who read widely and diversely in a wide variety of genres and text types.

In the quest to build capable readers,  here at Chestnut Oaks Middle School promoting independent, self-selected reading remains key. Creating  lifelong readers doesn’t just happen, it takes a schoolwide culture to help reach that goal.

We want kids to read more. We want them to enjoy reading. We know that reading builds vocabulary, fluency, and background knowledge. So as educators and parents let’s do our part to promote and encourage independent reading across our schools.